New maps of global geological provinces and tectonic plates

Credit: Dr. Derrick Hasterok, University of Adelaide New models that show how the continents were assembled are providing fresh insights into the history of the Earth and will help provide a better understanding of natural hazards like earthquakes and volcanoes. “We looked at the current knowledge of the configuration of plate boundary zones and the … Read more

Do Earthquakes and Tectonic Plates Have a Two-Way Relationship?

Residents of Izmit, Turkey, were sleeping when the ground started shaking on 17 August 1999. The quake registered a magnitude of 7.4, triggered aftershocks, and proved utterly devastating, leaving more than 17,000 dead, tens of thousands injured, and billions of dollars in damages. But it was extraordinary for another reason: It affected the movement of … Read more

Hot springs reveal where continental plates collide beneath Tibet — ScienceDaily

By analyzing the chemistry of over 200 geothermal springs, researchers have identified where the Indian Plate ends beneath Tibet, debunking some long-debated theories about the process of continental collision. In the classic example of mountain-building, the Indian and Asian continental plates crashed – and continue colliding today – to form the world’s largest and highest … Read more

These hot springs reveal where continental plates collide beneath Tibet

Credit: Ping Zhao. In the classic example of mountain-building, the Indian and Asian continental plates crashed – and continue colliding today – to form the world’s largest and highest geologic structures: The Himalayan Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. Despite the importance of these formations, which influence the global climate through atmospheric circulation and seasonal monsoons, … Read more

Hot Springs Reveal Where Continental Plates Collide Beneath Tibet – Long-Debated Theories Debunked

Pictured is a continuously spouting cauldron of near-boiling water, one of a dozen spanning a 10-acre geothermal field at Mangra in southern Tibet. Helium-isotope geochemistry shows it sits above the northern edge of the Indian plate 50 miles below, where India is underthrusting Asian crust to build the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. Credit: Ping Zhao … Read more

Stanford researchers use hot springs to map where continental plates collide beneath Tibet

March 14, 2022 By analyzing the chemistry of over 200 geothermal springs, researchers have identified where the Indian Plate ends beneath Tibet, debunking some long-debated theories about the process of continental collision. Watch the video here. By Danielle Torrent Tucker In the classic example of mountain-building, the Indian and Asian continental plates crashed – and … Read more

Hot springs reveal where continental plates collide beneath Tibet

In the classic example of mountain-building, the Indian and Asian continental plates crashed – and continue colliding today – to form the world’s largest and highest geologic structures: the Himalayan Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. Go to the web site to view the video. Doug Prose Stanford geophysics Professor Simon Klemperer and his research team … Read more